City Commission Greenlights Trail Project Art Contractor in Marquette

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TL/DR –

The Marquette City Commission has approved a $100,000 contract with Urban Ecosystems for the creation of eight public art installations along the Marquette Cultural Trail. A diverse group, including staff from Marquette city and various local organizations, chose the locations for the installations. The project is funded entirely through grants, with $55,000 coming from the National Endowment for the Arts and $45,000 from the Native American Heritage Foundation.


Marquette City Approves Art Installations Contract

The Marquette City Commission has green-lighted a $100,000 contract with Urban Ecosystems for the creation of eight art installations on the Marquette Cultural Trail.

The locations for these public art pieces were selected by a group comprising staff from City of Marquette, Beaumier Heritage Center, Marquette Regional History Center, Superior Watershed Partnership, Maritime Museum, Northern Michigan University, a Northern Michigan University student, a Marquette Public Art Commission member and a tribal representative.

Art Installation Locations

  1. Gichi-Naame-Ziibing will be situated near the Carp River Kiln in South Marquette.
  2. Nagomikong will be positioned south of Founder’s Landing off South Lakeshore Boulevard and at the entrance to the Founder’s Landing Pier and Mattson Lower Harbor Park.
  3. Bagidaabineyashi will be located at the entrance to Lighthouse Park.
  4. Nagomikong will be along a newly restored part of North Lakeshore Boulevard, next to a public parking lot.
  5. Ginibo Nissimin Makatewagamitig weia sibim will be at the mouth of the Dead River near Clark Lambros Park.
  6. Ashkikomaan Neiashi will be near the entrance to Presque Isle Park.

According to Marquette City Manager, Karen Kovacs, there’s potential for future additions to the trail. “We recognize that there are more than eight significant locations in our city or along this trail. There is an opportunity to continue expanding this project as we secure more funding,” she said.

This project is entirely grant-funded with $55,000 from the National Endowment for the Arts and $45,000 from the Native American Heritage Foundation.


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