Appeals Court Reviews Meadows’ Request for Federal Racketeering Case

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TL/DR –

Mark Meadows’ lawyers argued in front of the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that his Georgia racketeering case should be moved to federal court. They believe that Meadow’s alleged actions happened “under the color” of his duties as Trump’s White House chief of staff and thus he should have the right to move his case from state court to federal court, potentially to a more favorable jury pool. If successful, he could then claim immunity from prosecution under the Constitution’s supremacy clause, which he and his legal team argue should prohibit state interference in a federal official’s duties.


Mark Meadows Seeks Federal Transfer for Georgia Racketeering Case

Mark Meadows’ lawyers pleaded with the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Friday to reverse a judge’s decision prohibiting the shift of his Georgia racketeering case from state court to federal court.

Arguing that his alleged acts occurred “under the color” of his role as Trump’s White House chief of staff, Meadows’ attorneys contended he should be allowed to move the case to a federal court, where a potentially more favorable jury pool may be found.

Meadows’ lawyer George Terwilliger stated to the three-judge panel, “For purposes of removal, he doesn’t have to establish the outer limits of his office, he merely has to establish the nexus to his duties.”

Meadows’ Federal Immunity Defense

Terwilliger explained Meadows’ primary defense is a federal immunity defense. This follows after a federal Judge rejected Meadows’ arguments, initiating the appeal. The panel consisted of judges nominated by President Joe Biden, and former Presidents Barack Obama and George W. Bush.

If successful, Meadows could claim immunity from prosecution under the Constitution’s supremacy clause. His legal team argues this clause should bar “state interference in a federal official’s duties.”

Other defendants may follow suit if the ruling favors Meadows.

Meadows’ Previous Attempts to Move Case

Earlier this year, Meadows filed court documents seeking to move his Fulton County, Georgia, case to federal court. He was one of 19 people, including Trump, indicted over alleged attempts to overturn the 2020 election.

His attorneys contend that the acts in the indictment occurred during his tenure as Chief of Staff. They cited a federal law allowing federal officers to shift civil or criminal prosecutions in state court for purported actions taken “under color” of their offices to U.S. district court.

In the Fulton County racketeering case, several co-defendants have already pled guilty and are cooperating with the prosecutors.


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